The interrogation of Joan of Arc

Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999. xxv, 204p., first issue of the trade paperback. Faintest signs of handling. Medieval cultures volume 20.

A very close reading, and also an examination of the transcripts for evidence of transcriber's changes in the literal record, apparently without any purpose of "cover-up," done rather with a clerical eye to orthodoxy and literary coherence. Sample of Sullivan's prose, which is orthodox Grad Student: "In these responses, Joan showed a new willingness to discuss the physical appearance of the voices. Earlier she had refused to provide details about their hair, clothes, and rings and had responded to the clerics' questions about these details by insisting upon the identification of these voices as saints and angels... Now, however, in providing a physical description of the voices, she consented to the clerics' demand and portrayed ..the empirical perception without the emotion attached to the perception. By informing the clerics of the minuteness and the multiplicity of the voices without attempting to make sense of what she was describing, Joan spoke like the ideal patient describing her symptoms to the physician. She provided the details of her symptoms without hazarding a diagnosis of her illness.." p.145.

Cat.No: 96422
ISBN: 0816632685

Price: $15.00

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